Wayne State University

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Show your Warrior pride and join us to help the people of Flint

Show your Warrior pride and join us to help the people of Flint

Please contribute what you can to make a difference. Read More >>

On Campus

Community Engagement On Campus

Math Corps: All children have a unique and special greatness within them. WSU Math Corps helps children realize their own particular greatness, find out how.
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On Campus

Community Engagement On Campus

GO GIRLS: Increasing the confidence of middle school girls in science, technology, engineering and math. GO GIRLS!
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In the City

Community Engagement In the City

Free Clinic: The Frank Student Clinic offers an array of free, high quality healthcare services to the uninsured population of Detroit. Detroit is our campus.
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In the City

Community Engagement In the City

Free Legal Aid Clinic -- WSU Law School students in action: providing legal assistance to low-income, at risk, and elderly residents of Wayne County.
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Community Affairs Calendar

Calendar of Events

Full List
Water for Flint Donation Drive
February 10 2016
Hilberry Theatre
Theatre and Dance at Wayne encourages our community to donate water to assist the citizens of Flint. Please donate one of and provide our neighbors in Flint with a steady supply of one of life's basic necessities: water.   Donated water will be transported to Flint by the department of theatre and dance. The Hilberry Theatre is located on the corner of Cass Ave. and Hancock St.    Today is the day you can make a difference.
DEEP DESIGN: Pace, Place and Personhood
February 10 2016 at 10:00 AM
Elaine L. Jacob Gallery
DEEP DESIGN: Pace, Place and Personhood is a new multimedia design exhibition on display and open to the public at the Elaine L. Jacob Gallery on the Wayne State University campus from January 15 through March 25, 2016. The exhibition's opening reception, Friday, January 15, 5-8PM, follows the James Pearson Duffy Department of Art and Art History's memorial for art Professor Stanley Rosenthal taking place in the Community Arts Auditorium from 3PM to 5PM. DEEP DESIGN includes projects from designers, architects, artists and urbanists who are working in ways that reflect strong and enduring commitments to people and places. “Their work serves as evidence of truly co-creative relationships and each project challenges the transient nature of how design is done today,” explains Siobhan Gregory, guest curator and lecturer in industrial design at Wayne State University. This exhibition is supported by workshops, lectures and discussions at the university, through March 25, to encourage audiences to consider critical questions of design process, identity and ownership. As creative professionals and urban planners increasingly look to Detroit as a space of opportunity and experimentation, and the residents of Detroit as participants in and recipients of their creative endeavors, these questions are increasingly salient for our city and region. Work on view includes: Fallen Fruit’s Mid-Century Modern; Christian Nold’s Sensory Journeys; Sarah Rhodes’ The Craft of the Ubuntu; Jamie Hayes’ The Uniform Project; Urbz’s Homegrown Neighborhoods; Valentina Nisi's, Miguel Caldeira's and Mara Dionsio’s 7 Stories; and Kounkuey Design Initiative’s The Kibera Public Space Project. A schedule of supporting events, including lectures and workshops, will be shared at the exhibition opening reception on January 15. Exhibition:  DEEP DESIGN: an exhibition about pace, place and personhoodDates:  January 15 through March 25, 2016Opening Reception:  Friday, January 15, 5-8PMGallery Hours:  Tuesdays through Thursdays, 10AM-6PM; Fridays 10AM-7PM
"Off the Reservation: American Indian Life in the City"-Humanities Center
February 10 2016 at 12:30 PM
Faculty/Administration
The Humanities Center is proud to present as a part of its Brown Bag Colloquium Series, a talk by Michelle R. Jacobs, Visiting Assistant Professor, Sociology . ABSTRACT: American Indians often are racially miscategorized in urban spaces.  In part, their invisibility is caused by cultural images that define “Indianness” with respect to stereotypical attributes such as brown skin, black eyes, feathers, and full-bloodedness.  Based on 2 ½ years of ethnographic research in two urban American Indian communities, this presentation explores how urban American Indians simultaneously resist and reify racialized images that contribute to their invisibility in urban spheres.  Urban, frequently “mixed-blood” American Indians work to attach new meanings to Indianness that align with their individual experiences of Indian identity.  At the same time, however, they contradict their resistance efforts with incongruent practices and statements that indicate their attachment to the very meanings they wish to eradicate.  As such, this presentation illustrates the role of internalization in the reproduction of racialized images and myths about American Indian people.     These talks are free and open to the public! We also provide free coffee, tea, and cake!
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